Caspian

[kas-pee-uh n]

Origin of Caspian

First recorded in 1580–90
Related formstrans-Cas·pi·an, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for caspian

Contemporary Examples of caspian

  • When they returned, many came to this small building with arched windows only a few blocks from the grimy Caspian beach.

    The Daily Beast logo
    The Caucasus Connection

    Anna Nemtsova

    April 22, 2013

Historical Examples of caspian

  • The sun was blazing down upon a city on the western shore of the Caspian.

  • The Volga is the largest river of Europe and has its own sea, the Caspian.

    From Pole to Pole

    Sven Anders Hedin

  • All three seas are salt, the Baltic least and the Caspian most.

    From Pole to Pole

    Sven Anders Hedin

  • It empties into the Caspian Sea, with a delta of more than seventy branches.

    The Story of Russia

    R. Van Bergen, M.A.

  • Suddenly, to his great surprise, the Caspian Sea came into sight.

    A Book of Discovery

    Margaret Bertha (M. B.) Synge


Word Origin and History for caspian

Caspian

inland sea of central Asia, 1580s, from Latin Caspius, from Greek Kaspios, named for native people who lived on its shores (but who were said to be originally from the Caucasus), Latin Caspii, from a native self-designation, perhaps literally "white."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper