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Castile

[ka-steel]
See more synonyms for Castile on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. Spanish Cas·ti·lla [kahs-tee-lyah, -yah] /kɑsˈti lyɑ, -yɑ/. a former kingdom comprising most of Spain.
  2. Also called Castile soap. a variety of mild soap, made from olive oil and sodium hydroxide.
  3. any hard soap made from fats and oils, often partly from olive oil.
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Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words

detergentwashlathersudscastile

Examples from the Web for castile

Historical Examples

  • But they were rich in Almorox; the wine was the best in Castile.

    Rosinante to the Road Again

    John Dos Passos

  • They saw the banner of Castile come fluttering down from the masthead.

    Captain Blood

    Rafael Sabatini

  • The Supreme Council of Castile might anon condemn him for his practices.

    Captain Blood

    Rafael Sabatini

  • Because Castile is in the very heart of Spain, the capital, Madrid, is located there.

  • Castile isn't the only part of Spain with castles, of course.


British Dictionary definitions for castile

Castile

Castilla (Spanish kasˈtiʎa)

noun
  1. a former kingdom comprising most of modern Spain: originally part of León, it became an independent kingdom in the 10th century and united with Aragon (1469), the first step in the formation of the Spanish state
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Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for castile

Castile

medieval Spanish county and later kingdom, from Vulgar Latin castilla, from Latin castella, plural of castellum "castle, fort, citadel, stronghold" (see castle (n.)); so called in reference to the many fortified places there during the Moorish wars. The name in Spanish is said to date back to c.800. Related: Castilian. As a fine kind of soap, in English from 1610s.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper