Cato

[ key-toh ]
/ ˈkeɪ toʊ /

noun

Marcus Por·ci·us [pawr-shee-uh s, -shuh s] /ˈpɔr ʃi əs, -ʃəs/, the Elderorthe Censor, 234–149 b.c., Roman statesman, soldier, and writer.
his great-grandsonMarcus Porciusthe Younger, 95–46 b.c., Roman statesman, soldier, and Stoic philosopher.
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Examples from the Web for cato

British Dictionary definitions for cato

Cato

/ (ˈkeɪtəʊ) /

noun

Marcus Porcius (ˈmɑːkəsˈpɔːʃɪəs), known as Cato the Elder or the Censor. 234–149 bc, Roman statesman and writer, noted for his relentless opposition to Carthage
his great-grandson, Marcus Porcius, known as Cato the Younger or Uticensis. 95–46 bc, Roman statesman, general, and Stoic philosopher; opponent of Catiline and Caesar
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Culture definitions for cato

Cato

[ (kay-toh) ]

A politician of ancient Rome, known for his insistence that Carthage was Rome's permanent enemy. He had a custom of ending all his speeches in the Roman senate with the words “Carthage must be destroyed.”

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.