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cerate

[ seer-eyt ]
/ ˈsɪər eɪt /
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noun
Pharmacology. an unctuous, often medicated, preparation for external application, consisting of lard or oil mixed with wax, rosin, or the like, especially one that has a firmer consistency than a typical ointment and does not melt when in contact with the skin.
adjective
Also cerated. Ornithology. having a cere.
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Origin of cerate

1375–1425; late Middle English <Latin cērātum, neuter of cērātus (past participle of cērāre to cover or smear with wax), equivalent to cēr(a) wax + -ātus-ate1; compare Greek kērōtḗn in same sense
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use cerate in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for cerate

cerate
/ (ˈsɪərɪt, -reɪt) /

noun
a hard ointment or medicated paste consisting of lard or oil mixed with wax or resin

Word Origin for cerate

C16: from Latin cērātum, from cēra wax
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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