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chamomile

or cam·o·mile

[ kam-uh-mahyl, -meel ]

noun

  1. a composite plant, Chamaemelium nobile (or Anthemis nobilis ), native to the Old World, having strongly scented foliage and white ray flowers with yellow centers used medicinally and as a tea.
  2. any of several allied plants of the genera Matricaria and Tripleurospermum.


chamomile

/ ˈkæməˌmaɪl /

noun

  1. a variant spelling of camomile


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Word History and Origins

Origin of chamomile1

First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English camamyll, camomille, from Middle French, Old French camomille or Medieval Latin camomilla, for Latin chamaemēlon, from Greek chamaímēlon, equivalent to chamaí “on the ground” + mêlon “apple”; allegedly so called from the applelike odor of the flowers
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Example Sentences

With natural ingredients—including chamomile, clove oil, tea tree oil, and aloe vera—not only can you eliminate fungus and bacteria, but you leave the ears smelling great without those harsh chemical smells.

Before bed, simply spritz this solution on your pillow and breathe in the soothing natural scents of lavender, chamomile, and vetiver.

Most recently I tried acupuncture, Chinese herbs, raw apple cider vinegar, and chamomile tea.

Strong fennel and wormwood hit the back of my tongue along with a dryness from the barrel and hints of citrus from the chamomile.

Infusum cotul, L. From the dried flowers of may-weed or stinking chamomile (Anthemis cotula).

The oil of chamomile is extracted by distillation from the flowers of the matricaria chamomilla.

It is seldom used, but is given for the same troubles and in the same doses as chamomile and Eupatorium Ayapana.

But he put on a very wise expression as he handled the little dog and looking up, asked if he could get some chamomile tea.

A cup of coffee taken hot on an empty stomach, will frequently be as efficacious as the chamomile, in either of the above cases.

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chamoisChamonix