Idioms for change

Origin of change

1175–1225; (v.) Middle English cha(u)ngen < Anglo-French, Old French changer < Late Latin cambiāre, Latin cambīre to exchange; (noun) Middle English cha(u)nge < Anglo-French, Old French, noun derivative of the v.

OTHER WORDS FROM change

synonym study for change

1. Change, alter both mean to make a difference in the state or condition of a thing or to substitute another state or condition. To change is to make a material difference so that the thing is distinctly different from what it was: to change one's opinion. To alter is to make some partial change, as in appearance, but usually to preserve the identity: to alter a dress, as by raising the hem ( to change a dress would mean to put on a different one).
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for change

British Dictionary definitions for change

change
/ (tʃeɪndʒ) /

verb

noun

Derived forms of change

changeless, adjectivechangelessly, adverbchangelessness, nounchanger, noun

Word Origin for change

C13: from Old French changier, from Latin cambīre to exchange, barter
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with change

change

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.