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Charles

[ chahrlz; for 2 also French sharl ]
/ tʃɑrlz; for 2 also French ʃarl /
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noun
Prince of Edinburgh and of Wales, born 1948, heir apparent to the throne of Great Britain (son of Elizabeth II).
Jacques A·le·xan·dre Cé·sar [ah-lek-sahn-druhsey-zahr], /ɑ lɛk sɑ̃ drəseɪˈzɑr/, 1746–1823, French physicist and inventor.
Ray Ray Charles Robinson, 1930–2004, U.S. blues singer and pianist.
Cape, a cape in E Virginia, N of the entrance to the Chesapeake Bay.
a river in E Massachusetts, flowing between Boston and Cambridge into the Atlantic. 47 miles (75 km) long.
a male given name: from a Germanic word meaning “man.”
QUIZ
QUIZ YOURSELF ON "WAS" VS. "WERE"!
Were you ready for a quiz on this topic? Well, here it is! See how well you can differentiate between the uses of "was" vs. "were" in this quiz.
Question 1 of 7
“Was” is used for the indicative past tense of “to be,” and “were” is only used for the subjunctive past tense.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use Charles in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for Charles

Charles
/ (tʃɑːlz) /

noun
Prince of Wales. born 1948, son of Elizabeth II; heir apparent to the throne of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. He married (1981) Lady Diana Spencer; they separated in 1992 and were divorced in 1996; their son, Prince William of Wales, was born in 1982 and their second son, Prince Henry, in 1984; married (2005) Camilla Parker Bowles
Ray real name Ray Charles Robinson. 1930–2004, US singer, pianist, and songwriter, whose work spans jazz, blues, gospel, pop, and country music
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for Charles

Charles
[ chärlz ]
Jacques Alexandre César 1746-1823

French physicist and inventor who formulated Charles's law in 1787. In 1783 he became the first person to use hydrogen in balloons for flight.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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