chuffed

1
[ chuhft ]
/ tʃʌft /

adjective British Informal.

delighted; pleased; satisfied.

Nearby words

  1. chuddies,
  2. chuddy,
  3. chudskoye ozero,
  4. chufa,
  5. chuff,
  6. chuffing,
  7. chuffle,
  8. chuffy,
  9. chug,
  10. chug-a-lug

Origin of chuffed

1
First recorded in 1855–60; see origin at chuff2, -ed2

chuffed

2
[ chuhft ]
/ tʃʌft /

adjective British Informal.

annoyed; displeased; disgruntled.

Origin of chuffed

2
1825–35; compare dial. (mainly S England) chuff, choff ill-tempered, surly, probably to be identified with chuff1

chuff

3
[ chuhf ]
/ tʃʌf /

noun

a sound of or like the exhaust of a steam engine.

verb (used without object)

to emit or proceed with chuffs: The train chuffed along.

Origin of chuff

3
First recorded in 1910–15; imitative

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for chuffed



British Dictionary definitions for chuffed

chuffed

/ (tʃʌft) /

adjective

British slang pleased or delightednone too chuffed

chuff

1
/ (tʃʌf) /

noun

a puffing sound of or as if of a steam engine

verb

(intr) to move while emitting such soundsthe train chuffed on its way

Word Origin for chuff

C20: of imitative origin

chuff

2
/ (tʃʌf) /

noun

dialect a boor; churl; sullen fellow

Word Origin for chuff

C17: from obsolete chuff (n) fat cheek, of obscure origin

chuff

3
/ (tʃʌf) /

verb

(tr; usually passive) British slang to please or delighthe was chuffed by his pay rise

Word Origin for chuff

probably from chuff (adj) pleased, happy (earlier: chubby), from C16 chuff (obsolete n) a fat cheek, of unknown origin

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for chuffed

chuff

"pleased, happy," c.1860, British dialect, from obsolete chuff "swollen with fat" (1520s). A second British dialectal chuff has an opposite meaning, "displeased, gruff" (1832), from chuff "rude fellow," or, as Johnson has it, "a coarse, fat-headed, blunt clown" (mid-15c.), of unknown origin. Related: Chuffed.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper