cinematograph

[ sin-uh-mat-uh-graf, -grahf ]
/ ˌsɪn əˈmæt əˌgræf, -ˌgrɑf /
Chiefly British

noun

an early movie camera or projector, often a single mechanical device to record and project film.
Older Use. a movie theater.

verb (used with or without object)

Older Use. to record as a movie.

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Also Older Spelling, kin·e·mat·o·graph [kin-uh-mat-uh-graf, -grahf, kahy-nuh-] /ˌkɪn əˈmæt əˌgræf, -ˌgrɑf, ˌkaɪ nə-/ .

Origin of cinematograph

First recorded in 1895–1900; from French cinématographe, equivalent to cinémat- (from Greek kīnēmat-, stem of kī́nēma “motion”) + -o- connecting vowel + -graphe noun suffix; see -o-, -graph

OTHER WORDS FROM cinematograph

cin·e·mat·o·graph·ic [sin-uh-mat-uh-graf-ik], /ˌsɪn əˌmæt əˈgræf ɪk/, adjectivecin·e·mat·o·graph·i·cal·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for cinematograph

British Dictionary definitions for cinematograph

cinematograph
/ (ˌsɪnɪˈmætəˌɡrɑːf, -ˌɡræf) mainly British /

noun

a combined camera, printer, and projector

verb

to take pictures (of) with a film camera

Word Origin for cinematograph

C19 (earlier spelling kinematograph): from Greek kinēmat-, kinēma motion + -graph
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012