cleanup

[ kleen-uhp ]
/ ˈklinˌʌp /

noun

the act or process of cleaning up.
Slang. a very large profit: The company made a real cleanup on their new invention.
Baseball.
  1. the fourth position in the batting order: Our best home-run hitter is batting cleanup.
  2. the player who bats in this position.

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Origin of cleanup

1865–70, Americanism; noun use of verb phrase clean up
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for cleanup

British Dictionary definitions for cleanup

clean up

verb (adverb)

to rid (something) of dirt, filth, or other impurities
to make (someone or something) orderly or presentable
(tr) to rid (a place) of undesirable people or conditionsthe campaign against vice had cleaned up the city
(intr) informal to make a great profit

noun cleanup

  1. the process of cleaning up or eliminating something
  2. (as modifier)a cleanup campaign
informal, mainly US a great profit
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with cleanup

clean up

1

Also, clean out. Make clean or orderly, as in She cleaned up the cellar after the flood, or Dad said he cleaned out the garage. [First half of 1800s]

2

Also, wash up. Wash or tidy oneself, as in Do I have time to clean up before dinner?

3

Settle or dispose of, as in He cleaned up all the bills that had arrived during his vacation.

4

Bring to a certain standard of order or morality, as in This script won't do; we'll have to clean up the language. Applied to personal behavior, it also is put as clean up one's act, as in He'll have to clean up his act and obey the rules. [c. 1900]

5

Succeed, especially financially, as in We had fantastic luck at the races and really cleaned up. [Slang; first half of 1800s]

6

Also, clean up on. Defeat or vanquish, kill, as in We're cleaning up all the other teams, or With enough ammunition we could clean up on this pocket of snipers. [Slang; mid-1800s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.