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closedown

[ klohz-doun ]
/ ˈkloʊzˌdaʊn /
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noun
a termination or suspension of operations; shutdown: a temporary closedown of a factory.
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Origin of closedown

1885–90, Americanism; noun use of verb phrase close down
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use closedown in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for closedown

close down
/ (kləʊz) /

verb (adverb)
to cease or cause to cease operationsthe shop closed down
(tr) sport to mark or move towards (an opposing player) in order to prevent him or her running with the ball or making or receiving a pass
noun close-down (ˈkləʊzˌdaʊn)
a closure or stoppage of operations, esp in a factory
British radio television the end of a period of broadcasting, esp late at night
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with closedown

close down

1

Also, close one's doors; shut down. Go out of business, end operations. For example, If the rent goes up we'll have to close down, or After fifty years in business the store finally closed its doors, or The warehouse had a clearance sale the month before it shut down for good. Also see close up, def. 2.

2

Force someone to go out of business, as in The police raided the porn shop and closed it down. Both usages date from the early 1900s, but shut down was first recorded in 1877.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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