coagulate

[verb koh-ag-yuh-leyt; adjective koh-ag-yuh-lit, -leyt]
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verb (used with or without object), co·ag·u·lat·ed, co·ag·u·lat·ing.
  1. to change from a fluid into a thickened mass; curdle; congeal: Let the pudding stand two hours until it coagulates.
  2. Biology. (of blood) to form a clot.
  3. Physical Chemistry. (of colloidal particles) to flocculate or cause to flocculate by adding an electrolyte to an electrostatic colloid.
adjective
  1. Obsolete. coagulated.

Origin of coagulate

1350–1400 for earlier past participle senses “solidified, clotted,” 1605–15 for def 1; Middle English < Latin coāgulāt(us) (past participle of coāgulāre), equivalent to coāgul(um) coagulum + -ātus -ate1
Related formsco·ag·u·la·tion, nounco·ag·u·la·to·ry [koh-ag-yuh-luh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] /koʊˈæg yə ləˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i/, co·ag·u·la·tive [koh-ag-yuh-ley-tiv, -luh-tiv] /koʊˈæg yəˌleɪ tɪv, -lə tɪv/, adjectivean·ti·co·ag·u·lat·ing, adjectivean·ti·co·ag·u·la·tion, noun, adjectivenon·co·ag·u·lat·ing, adjectivenon·co·ag·u·la·tion, nounnon·co·ag·u·la·tive, adjectivere·co·ag·u·late, verb, re·co·ag·u·lat·ed, re·co·ag·u·lat·ing.re·co·ag·u·la·tion, nounun·co·ag·u·lat·ed, adjectiveun·co·ag·u·lat·ing, adjectiveun·co·ag·u·la·tive, adjective

Synonyms for coagulate

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Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for coagulate

Historical Examples of coagulate

  • The disintegrated mass of rabbits commenced, as it were, to solidify, to coagulate.

    The Octopus

    Frank Norris

  • If the stock is not reduced and more jelly is desired, unflavored gelatine may be dissolved and added to coagulate the liquid.

    Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 3

    Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences

  • Rennet is added to the milk to coagulate it, and then the curd, from which nearly all the water is removed, is allowed to ripen.

    Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 2

    Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences

  • That protein is present in both the yolk and the white is apparent from the fact that they coagulate when heat is applied.

    Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 2

    Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences

  • With the temperature at the right point, rennet is added to coagulate the milk, or form the curd.

    Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 2

    Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences


British Dictionary definitions for coagulate

coagulate

verb (kəʊˈæɡjʊˌleɪt)
  1. to cause (a fluid, such as blood) to change into a soft semisolid mass or (of such a fluid) to change into such a mass; clot; curdle
  2. chem to separate or cause to separate into distinct constituent phases
noun (kəʊˈæɡjʊlɪt, -ˌleɪt)
  1. the solid or semisolid substance produced by coagulation
Derived Formscoagulable, adjectivecoagulability, nouncoagulation, nouncoagulative (kəʊˈæɡjʊlətɪv), adjective

Word Origin for coagulate

C16: from Latin coāgulāre to make (a liquid) curdle, from coāgulum rennet, from cōgere to drive together
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for coagulate
v.

early 15c., from Latin coagulatus, past participle of coagulare "to cause to curdle," from cogere "to curdle, collect" (see cogent). Earlier coagule, c.1400, from Middle French coaguler. Related: Coagulated; coagulating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

coagulate in Medicine

coagulate

[kō-ăgyə-lāt′]
v.
  1. To change from the liquid state to a solid or gel; clot.
Related formsco•ag′u•la•bili•ty n.co•agu•la′tor n.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.