coati

[ koh-ah-tee ]
/ koʊˈɑ ti /

noun, plural co·a·tis.

a diurnal omnivore related to the raccoon, having an elongated body, a long, ringed, nonprehensile tail, and a slender, flexible snout: the two genera are Nasua, found in the southwestern U.S. and southward to Uruguay, and Nasuella, the mountain coatis of Venezuela, Colombia, and Ecuador.

QUIZZES

DON’T VACILLATE! VANQUISH THIS WORD OF THE DAY QUIZ!

It’d be a real faux pas to miss this quiz on the words from August 3–9, 2020!
Question 1 of 7
What does “vacillate” mean?
Also called co·a·ti·mun·di [koh-ah-tee-muhn-dee] /koʊˈɑ tiˈmʌn di/ .

Origin of coati

First recorded in 1670–80; from Portuguese, from Tupi, equivalent to cua “belt” + ti, tim “nose”
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for coati

British Dictionary definitions for coati

coati

coati-mondi or coati-mundi (kəʊˌɑːtɪˈmʌndɪ)

/ (kəʊˈɑːtɪ) /

noun plural -tis or -dis

any omnivorous mammal of the genera Nasua and Nasuella, of Central and South America: family Procyonidae, order Carnivora (carnivores). They are related to but larger than the raccoons, having a long flexible snout and a brindled coat

Word Origin for coati

C17: from Portuguese coatì, from Tupi, literally: belt-nosed, from cua belt + tim nose
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012