cock

1
[kok]

noun

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

to cock the firing mechanism of a firearm.

Nearby words

  1. cochleovestibular,
  2. cochliomyia,
  3. cochlitis,
  4. cochran,
  5. cocinero,
  6. cock a snook,
  7. cock and bull story,
  8. cock feather,
  9. cock of the walk,
  10. cock of the woods

Origin of cock

1
before 900; Middle English cock, Old English cocc; cognate with Old Norse kokkr; orig. imitative

Related formscock·like, adjective

cock

2
[kok]

verb (used with object)

to set or turn up or to one side, often in an assertive, jaunty, or significant manner: He cocked his eyebrow questioningly.

verb (used without object)

to stand or stick up conspicuously.
Scot. and New England. to strut; swagger; put on airs of importance.

noun

the act of turning the head, a hat, etc., up or to one side in a jaunty or significant way.
the position of anything thus placed.

Origin of cock

2
First recorded in 1705–15; probably special use of cock1

cock

3
[kok]

noun Chiefly Northern and North Midland U.S.

a conical pile of hay, dung, etc.

verb (used with object)

to pile (hay, dung, etc.) in cocks.

Origin of cock

3
1350–1400; Middle English; cognate with dialectal German Kocke heap of hay or dung, Norwegian kok heap, lump; akin to Old Norse kǫkkr lump

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for cock


British Dictionary definitions for cock

cock

1

noun

the male of the domestic fowl
  1. any other male bird
  2. the male of certain other animals, such as the lobster
  3. (as modifier)a cock sparrow
a taboo slang word for penis
  1. the hammer of a firearm
  2. its position when the firearm is ready to be discharged
British informal a friend, mate, or fellow
a jaunty or significant tilting or turning upwardsa cock of the head
British informal nonsense

verb

(tr) to set the firing pin, hammer, or breech block of (a firearm) so that a pull on the trigger will release it and thus fire the weapon
(tr) to set the shutter mechanism of (a camera) so that the shutter can be tripped by pressing the shutter-release button
(tr sometimes foll by up) to raise in an alert or jaunty manner
(intr) to stick or stand up conspicuously
See also cockup

Word Origin for cock

Old English cocc (referring to the male fowl; the development of C15 sense spout, tap, and other transferred senses is not clear), ultimately of imitative origin; related to Old Norse kokkr, French coq, Late Latin coccus

noun

a small, cone-shaped heap of hay, straw, etc

verb

(tr) to stack (hay, straw, etc) in such heaps

Word Origin for cock

C14 (in Old English, cocc is attested in place names): perhaps of Scandinavian origin; compare Norwegian kok, Danish dialect kok

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for cock
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper