cockle

1
[ kok-uhl ]
/ ˈkɒk əl /

noun

verb (used without object), cock·led, cock·ling.

to contract into wrinkles; pucker: This paper cockles easily.
to rise in short, irregular waves; ripple: The waves cockled along the shore.

verb (used with object), cock·led, cock·ling.

to cause to wrinkle, pucker, or ripple: The wind cockled the water.

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Idioms for cockle

    cockles of one's heart, the depths of one's emotions or feelings: The happy family scene warmed the cockles of his heart.

Origin of cockle

1
1350–1400; Middle English cokille<Middle French coqille<Vulgar Latin *cocchīlia,Latin conchylia, plural of conchȳlium<Greek konchȳ́lion, equivalent to konchȳ́l(ē) mussel + -ion diminutive suffix; compare Old English -cocc, in sǣ-cocc literally, sea-cockle <Vulgar Latin *coccus for Latin conchaconch

Definition for cockle (2 of 2)

cockle2
[ kok-uhl ]
/ ˈkɒk əl /

noun

a weed, as the darnel Lolium temulentum, or rye grass, L. perenne.

Origin of cockle

2
before 1000; Middle English; Old English coccel
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for cockle

British Dictionary definitions for cockle (1 of 2)

cockle1
/ (ˈkɒkəl) /

noun

verb

to contract or cause to contract into wrinkles

Word Origin for cockle

C14: from Old French coquille shell, from Latin conchӯlium shellfish, from Greek konkhulion, diminutive of konkhule mussel; see conch

British Dictionary definitions for cockle (2 of 2)

cockle2
/ (ˈkɒkəl) /

noun

any of several plants, esp the corn cockle, that grow as weeds in cornfields
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012