Advertisement

View synonyms for cockle

cockle

1

[ kok-uhl ]

noun

  1. any bivalve mollusk of the genus Cardium, having somewhat heart-shaped, radially ribbed valves, especially C. edule, the common edible species of Europe.
  2. any of various allied or similar mollusks.
  3. a cockle in fabric.

  4. a small, crisp candy of sugar and flour, bearing a motto.


verb (used without object)

, cock·led, cock·ling.
  1. to contract into wrinkles; pucker:

    This paper cockles easily.

  2. to rise in short, irregular waves; ripple:

    The waves cockled along the shore.

verb (used with object)

, cock·led, cock·ling.
  1. to cause to wrinkle, pucker, or ripple:

    The wind cockled the water.

cockle

2

[ kok-uhl ]

noun

  1. a weed, as the darnel Lolium temulentum, or rye grass, L. perenne.

cockle

1

/ ˈkɒkəl /

noun

  1. any sand-burrowing bivalve mollusc of the family Cardiidae, esp Cardium edule ( edible cockle ) of Europe, typically having a rounded shell with radiating ribs
  2. any of certain similar or related molluscs
  3. short for cockleshell
  4. a wrinkle or puckering, as in cloth or paper
  5. a small furnace or stove
  6. cockles of one's heart
    one's deepest feelings (esp in the phrase warm the cockles of one's heart )


verb

  1. to contract or cause to contract into wrinkles

cockle

2

/ ˈkɒkəl /

noun

  1. any of several plants, esp the corn cockle, that grow as weeds in cornfields
Discover More

Word History and Origins

Origin of cockle1

First recorded in 1300–50; Middle English cokel, cokil(le), from Old French coquille, “shell, shell of a mollusk, mollusk,” from Vulgar Latin cocchīlia (unattested), from Latin conchylia, plural of conchȳlium, from Greek konchȳ́lion, equivalent to konchȳ́l(ē) “mussel, cockle” + -ion diminutive suffix; compare Old English -cocc in sǣ-cocc literally, “sea-cockle” from Vulgar Latin coccus (unattested) for Latin concha conch

Origin of cockle2

First recorded before 1000; Middle English cok(k)el, Old English coccel; further origin uncertain; perhaps from Late Latin cocculus (unattested), diminutive of coccus “berry, seed” ( coccus ( def ) )
Discover More

Word History and Origins

Origin of cockle1

C14: from Old French coquille shell, from Latin conchӯlium shellfish, from Greek konkhulion, diminutive of konkhule mussel; see conch
Discover More

Idioms and Phrases

Idioms
  1. cockles of one's heart, the depths of one's emotions or feelings:

    The happy family scene warmed the cockles of his heart.

Discover More

Example Sentences

A collection of fossilized cockle shells, each with a natural hole in the top, perfect for stringing into a necklace “or some other intention,” was found fused into the floor of a cave overlooking Cartagena Harbor in Spain.

We naturally wish to identify all the national dishes; so, "Is this cockle soup, Susanna?"

They loved to bind his forehead with the cockle shells that decked their own tresses.

But in Shakespeare's time Darnel, like Cockle (which see), was the general name for any hurtful weed.

It was the wildest and coldest season of the year, and the vessels in which the attempt was to be made were mere cockle-shells.

Twelve cockle-shells and a halfpenny china figure were ranged solemnly along the mantel-shelf.

Advertisement

Definitions and idiom definitions from Dictionary.com Unabridged, based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

Idioms from The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement


cockishcockleboat