Advertisement

Advertisement

View synonyms for cognitive

cognitive

[ kog-ni-tiv ]

adjective

  1. of or relating to cognition; concerned with the act or process of knowing, perceiving, etc. :

    cognitive development;

    cognitive functioning.

  2. of or relating to the mental processes of perception, memory, judgment, and reasoning, as contrasted with emotional and volitional processes.


ˈcognitive

/ ˈkɒɡnɪtɪv /

adjective

  1. of or relating to cognition


Discover More

Other Words From

  • cogni·tive·ly adverb
  • cogni·tivi·ty noun
  • non·cogni·tive adjective
Discover More

Word History and Origins

Origin of cognitive1

First recorded in 1580–90; from Medieval Latin cognitīvus, equivalent to Latin cognit(us) “learned, known” ( cognition ) + -īvus -ive
Discover More

Example Sentences

As momentum gains for a more cognitive and social approach for training AI, neuroscience studies that help us understand how we learn from one another may also benefit learning algorithms that teach AI to learn by observing us.

In nine experiments, psychologist Jorge Morales, philosopher Alex Bax, and cognitive scientist Chaz Firestone showed that the elliptical image on the back of the eye likely stays with us.

This difference drew popular attention and was suggested to cause cognitive sex differences.

Previous studies found that running also stimulates fat cells and muscle to benefit the brain’s regenerative and cognitive functions—with each organ using their own molecular “phone lines.”

Research now suggests that use results in prolonged lifespan and enhanced cognitive and immune function.

A big part of the reason is a simple psychological phenomenon called cognitive dissonance.

In this way, certain cognitive mechanisms can act like a hammer too eager for nails.

This dietary supplement originates in China and has been reported to enhance cognitive ability in healthy individuals.

Later, cognitive and behavioral problems can occur; dementia is not uncommon.

The point at which autonomy should be handed over to the child is less clear when parenting children with cognitive disabilities.

For the present, we are only concerned with such as are cognitive.

We have, in other words, been assuming that language moves entirely in the ideational or cognitive sphere.

It means, in short, that he is in an aesthetic attitude of realization rather than in a cognitive attitude.

The interest with which this discipline is approached is therefore not commonly the intellectual or cognitive interest simply.

It may be either logical, cognitive, scientific or even metaphysical.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement


cognitionCognitive Behavioural Therapy