cognize

[kog-nahyz]

verb (used with object), cog·nized, cog·niz·ing.

to perceive; become conscious of; know.

Also especially British, cog·nise.

Origin of cognize

First recorded in 1650–60; back formation from cognizance
Related formscog·niz·er, nounpre·cog·nize, verb (used with object), pre·cog·nized, pre·cog·niz·ing.un·cog·nized, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for cognize

Historical Examples of cognize

  • To think an object and to cognize an object are by no means the same thing.

  • Thus we cognize only the necessity of effects in nature, the causes of which are given us.

  • Still, you could not cognize in concreto the object of your ideas in any experience.

  • By attribute, I understand that by which I cognize any mode of existence.

  • To know or cognize is, to know the Cause; when we know the Cause, we are satisfied with our cognition.

    Aristotle

    George Grote


British Dictionary definitions for cognize

cognize

cognise

verb

(tr) to perceive, become aware of, or know
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for cognize
v.

1650s, back-formation from cognizance. Related: Cognized; cognizing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper