Origin of divine

1275–1325; Middle English < Latin dīvīnus, equivalent to dīv(us) god + -īnus -ine1; replacing Middle English devin(e) < Old French devin < Latin, as above
Related formsdi·vin·a·ble, adjectivedi·vine·ly, adverbdi·vine·ness, nounhalf-di·vine, adjectivehalf-di·vine·ly, adverbpre·di·vin·a·ble, adjectivepseu·do·di·vine, adjectivesub·di·vine, adjectivesub·di·vine·ly, adverbsub·di·vine·ness, nounsu·per·di·vine, adjectiveun·di·vin·a·ble, adjectiveun·di·vined, adjectiveun·di·vin·ing, adjective

Synonyms for divine

Antonyms for divine

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for divine

Contemporary Examples of divine

Historical Examples of divine

  • I think this blessing comes from the Divine, by reason of the innocence of his life.

    Philothea

    Lydia Maria Child

  • I asked, 'Is this the divine home, whence I departed into the body?'

    Philothea

    Lydia Maria Child

  • Knowing the Milbreys, you will divine the warmth of their behaviour toward the son.

    The Spenders

    Harry Leon Wilson

  • What that truth may be, we leave to the intelligence of the reader to divine.

  • All ferocity must be misinterpretation of the divine law of harmony and mutual help.


British Dictionary definitions for divine

divine

adjective

of, relating to, or characterizing God or a deity
godlike
of, relating to, or associated with religion or worshipthe divine liturgy
of supreme excellence or worth
informal splendid; perfect

noun

the divine (often capital) another term for God
a priest, esp one learned in theology

verb

to perceive or understand (something) by intuition or insight
to conjecture (something); guess
to discern (a hidden or future reality) as though by supernatural power
(tr) to search for (underground supplies of water, metal, etc) using a divining rod
Derived Formsdivinable, adjectivedivinely, adverbdivineness, noundiviner, noun

Word Origin for divine

C14: from Latin dīvīnus, from dīvus a god; related to deus a god
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for divine
adj.

c.1300, from Old French devin (12c.), from Latin divinus "of a god," from divus "a god," related to deus "god, deity" (see Zeus). Weakened sense of "excellent" had evolved by late 15c.

v.

"to conjure, to guess," originally "to make out by supernatural insight," mid-14c., from Old French deviner, from Vulgar Latin *devinare, dissimilated from *divinare, from Latin divinus (see divine (adj.)), which also meant "soothsayer." Related: Divined; diviner; divining. Divining rod (or wand) attested from 1650s.

n.

c.1300, "soothsayer," from Old French devin, from Latin divinus (adj.); see divine (adj.). Meaning "ecclesiastic, theologian" is from late 14c.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper