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cohere

[ koh-heer ]
/ koʊˈhɪər /
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verb (used without object), co·hered, co·her·ing.
to stick together; be united; hold fast, as parts of the same mass: The particles of wet flour cohered to form a paste.
Physics. (of two or more similar substances) to be united within a body by the action of molecular forces.
to be naturally or logically connected: Without sound reasoning no argument will cohere.
to agree; be congruous: Her account of the incident cohered with his.
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Origin of cohere

First recorded in 1590–1600; from Latin cohaerēre, equivalent to co-co- + haerēre “to stick, cling”

synonym study for cohere

1. See stick2.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

How to use cohere in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for cohere

cohere
/ (kəʊˈhɪə) /

verb (intr)
to hold or stick firmly together
to be connected logically; be consistent
physics to be held together by the action of molecular forces

Word Origin for cohere

C16: from Latin cohaerēre from co- together + haerēre to cling, adhere
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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