Coleridge

[kohl-rij]
Related formsCole·ridg·i·an, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for coleridge

Contemporary Examples of coleridge

  • Coleridge demanded that they no longer call themselves "philosophers."

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    Great Weekend Reads

    The Daily Beast

    March 5, 2011

  • “He was terribly angry in perfectly passive way,” Coleridge explained in perfect British understatement.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Literary Life

    Sara Nelson

    June 17, 2009

Historical Examples of coleridge

  • Lamb and Coleridge, on the other hand, have praised "Lear" as a world's masterpiece.

  • Coleridge calls "Lear," "the open and ample playground of Nature's passions."

  • It was Coleridge's: "Poetry—the best words in the best order."

    The Lyric

    John Drinkwater

  • The prophets of the new blessing, Wordsworth and Coleridge, I knew nothing of.

    Wilfrid Cumbermede

    George MacDonald

  • Coleridge's blossoming period as a romantic poet was tragically brief.


British Dictionary definitions for coleridge

Coleridge

noun
  1. Samuel Taylor. 1772–1834, English Romantic poet and critic, noted for poems such as The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1798), Kubla Khan (1816), and Christabel (1816), and for his critical work Biographia Literaria (1817)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012