collocate

[ kol-uh-keyt ]
/ ˈkɒl əˌkeɪt /

verb (used with object), col·lo·cat·ed, col·lo·cat·ing.

to set or place together, especially side by side.
to arrange in proper order: to collocate events.

verb (used without object), col·lo·cat·ed, col·lo·cat·ing.

Linguistics. to enter into a collocation.

noun

Linguistics. a lexical item that collocates with another.

Origin of collocate

1505–15; < Latin collocātus (past participle of collocāre), equivalent to col- col-1 + loc(us) place + -ātus -ate1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for collocate

  • Collocate e poste una appresso all' altra con diligenza e cura esatta.

    Pagan and Christian Rome|Rodolfo Lanciani
  • Published in two volumes with the title: Indicazione delle immagini di Maria, collocate sulle mura esterne di Roma.

    Pagan and Christian Rome|Rodolfo Lanciani

British Dictionary definitions for collocate

collocate

/ (ˈkɒləˌkeɪt) /

verb

(tr) to group or place together in some system or order

Word Origin for collocate

C16: from Latin collocāre, from com- together + locāre to place, from locus place
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for collocate

collocate


v.

1510s, from Latin collocatus, past participle of collocare "to arrange, place together, set in a place," from com- "together" (see com-) + locare "to place" (see locate). Meaning "conference, consultation" is mid-14c. Related: collocated; collocating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper