comb

1
[ kohm ]
/ koʊm /

noun

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

to roll over or break at the crest, as a wave.

Nearby words

  1. comate,
  2. comatic,
  3. comatose,
  4. comatulid,
  5. comayagua,
  6. comb back,
  7. comb jelly,
  8. comb out,
  9. comb-footed spider,
  10. comb-out

Origin of comb

1
before 900; Middle English; Old English comb, camb; cognate with Old High German kamb (German Kamm), Old Norse kambr, Greek gómphos “pin, peg,” gomphíos “molar tooth”; see cam1

Related formscomb·less, adjectivecomb·less·ness, nounun·combed, adjectivewell-combed, adjective

comb

2
[ koom, kohm ]
/ kum, koʊm /

noun

combe

or comb, coomb, coombe

[ koom, kohm ]
/ kum, koʊm /

noun British.

a narrow valley or deep hollow, especially one enclosed on all but one side.

Origin of combe

Old English cumb valley < British Celtic; cf. cwm

comb.

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for comb


British Dictionary definitions for comb

comb

/ (kəʊm) /

noun

verb

(tr) to use a comb on
(when tr, often foll by through) to search or inspect with great carethe police combed the woods
See also comb out

Word Origin for comb

Old English camb; related to Old Norse kambr, Old High German camb

combe

comb

/ (kuːm) /

noun

variant spellings of coomb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for comb
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with comb

comb

see fine-tooth comb.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.