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come-on

[ kuhm-on, -awn ]
/ ˈkʌmˌɒn, -ˌɔn /
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noun Slang.

inducement; lure.

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Origin of come-on

1895–1900, Americanism; noun use of verb phrase come on
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for come-on

British Dictionary definitions for come-on

come on

verb (intr, mainly adverb)

noun come-on

informal anything that serves as a lure or enticement
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with come-on

come on

1

Move forward, progress, develop. For example, We stopped as soon as darkness began to come on. [Early 1600s]

2

Hurry up, as in Come on now, it's getting late. This imperative to urge someone forward has been so used since about 1450.

3

Also, come upon. Meet or find unexpectedly, as in We came on him while walking down the street, or I came upon an old friend in the bookstore today. [Second half of 1700s]

4

Make a stage entrance, as in After the next cue she comes on from the right. [Early 1800s]

5

Please oblige me, as in Come on, that's no excuse for leaving, or Come on, you'll really like this restaurant. [Colloquial; first half of 1900s]

6

Convey a specific personal image, as in He comes on like a go-getter but he's really rather timid. [Slang; c. 1940]

7

Also, come on strong. Behave or speak in an aggressive way, as in Take it easy; you're coming on awfully strong. [c. 1940]

8

Also, come on to. Make sexual advances, as in She reported her boss for coming on to her. This usage probably was derived from the earlier use of the noun come-on for a sexual advance. [Slang; 1950s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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