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compound-complex sentence

[ kom-pound-kom-pleks ]
/ ˈkɒm paʊndˈkɒm plɛks /
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noun

a sentence having two or more coordinate independent clauses and one or more dependent clauses, as The lightning flashed (independent clause) and the rain fell (independent clause) as he entered the house (dependent clause).

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On the farm, the feed for chicks is significantly different from the roosters’; ______ not even comparable.

Origin of compound-complex sentence

First recorded in 1920–25
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Cultural definitions for compound-complex sentence

compound-complex sentence

A sentence that contains at least two independent clauses and at least one dependent clause: “Queen Elizabeth I was called a redhead (independent clause), but no one knew her hair color for sure (independent clause) because she always wore a wig (dependent clause).” “Because she always wore a wig” is a dependent clause starting with the subordinating conjunction (see subordination) because. (Compare complex sentence, compound sentence, and simple sentence.)

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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