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Compton effect

noun

, Physics.
  1. the increase in wavelength of monochromatic, electromagnetic radiation, as a beam of photons or x-rays, when it is scattered by particles whose size is small compared to the wavelength of the radiation.


Compton effect

/ ˈkɒmptən /

noun

  1. a phenomenon in which a collision between a photon and a particle results in an increase in the kinetic energy of the particle and a corresponding increase in the wavelength of the photon


Compton effect

  1. An increase in the wavelength of electromagnetic radiation, especially of x-rays or gamma-rays, when the photons constituting the radiation collide with free electrons. As a result of the Compton effect, the photons transfer some of their energy to the electrons. It is mainly through the Compton effect that matter absorbs radiant energy.


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Word History and Origins

Origin of Compton effect1

First recorded in 1920–25; named after A. H. Compton

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Word History and Origins

Origin of Compton effect1

C20: named after Arthur Holly Compton (1892–1962), US physicist

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