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conceivable

[kuh n-see-vuh-buh l]
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adjective
  1. capable of being conceived; imaginable.
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Origin of conceivable

1425–75; late Middle English. See conceive, -able
Related formscon·ceiv·a·bil·i·ty, con·ceiv·a·ble·ness, nouncon·ceiv·a·bly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for conceivably

perhaps, probably, likely, conceivably, perchance, maybe, peradventure, mayhap, conceivable, credible, feasible, obtainable, imaginably, theoretically, abstractly, hypothetically, reasonably, feasibly, expectedly

Examples from the Web for conceivably

Contemporary Examples of conceivably

Historical Examples of conceivably

  • In an engagement, he might conceivably defeat Blood's followers.

    Captain Blood

    Rafael Sabatini

  • And if there conceivably were, it would be something altogether horrible.

    The Moon is Green

    Fritz Reuter Leiber

  • Even the comfort of the bottle might conceivably fail him in this supreme crisis.

    Under Western Eyes

    Joseph Conrad

  • This could conceivably be of advantage to a man who wanted a lift in the world.

    The Rescue

    Joseph Conrad

  • He may conceivably think that they would put him on a rack if they got the chance.

    The Red Hand of Ulster

    George A. Birmingham


British Dictionary definitions for conceivably

conceivable

adjective
  1. capable of being understood, believed, or imagined; possible
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Derived Formsconceivability or conceivableness, nounconceivably, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for conceivably

conceivable

adj.

mid-15c. (implied in conceivableness), from conceive + -able. Originally in a now-obsolete sense "that can be received." Meaning "that can be imagined" is attested from 1620s (in conceivably).

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper