concentrated

[ kon-suh n-trey-tid ]
/ ˈkɒn sənˌtreɪ tɪd /

adjective

applied with all one's attention, energy, etc.: their concentrated efforts to win the election.
clustered or gathered together closely.
treated to remove or reduce an inessential ingredient, especially liquid: concentrated orange juice.

Nearby words

  1. concelebrate,
  2. concelebration,
  3. concent,
  4. concenter,
  5. concentrate,
  6. concentration,
  7. concentration camp,
  8. concentration cell,
  9. concentration gradient,
  10. concentrative

Origin of concentrated

First recorded in 1680–90; concentrate + -ed2

Related forms

concentrate

[ kon-suhn-treyt ]
/ ˈkɒn sənˌtreɪt /

verb (used with object), con·cen·trat·ed, con·cen·trat·ing.

verb (used without object), con·cen·trat·ed, con·cen·trat·ing.

noun

a concentrated form of something; a product of concentration: a juice concentrate.

Origin of concentrate

1630–40; concentr(ic) + -ate2; compare French concentrer, Italian concentrare

Related forms

Synonym study

1. See contract.

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for concentrated


British Dictionary definitions for concentrated

concentrate

/ (ˈkɒnsənˌtreɪt) /

verb

to come or cause to come to a single purpose or aimto concentrate one's hopes on winning
to make or become denser or purer by the removal of certain elements, esp the solvent of a solution
(tr) to remove rock or sand from (an ore) to make it purer
(intr often foll by on) to bring one's faculties to bear (on); think intensely (about)

noun

a concentrated material or solutiontomato concentrate
Derived Formsconcentrator, noun

Word Origin for concentrate

C17: back formation from concentration, ultimately from Latin com- same + centrum centre

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for concentrated
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper