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congius

[ kon-jee-uhs ]
/ ˈkɒn dʒi əs /
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noun, plural con·gi·i [kon-jee-ahy]. /ˈkɒn dʒiˌaɪ/.
(in prescriptions) a gallon (3.7853 liters).
an ancient Roman unit of liquid measure equal to about 0.8 U.S. gallon (3.2 liters).
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Origin of congius

1350–1400; Middle English <Latin, alteration of Greek konchíon, equivalent to kónch(ē) conch + -ion diminutive suffix
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

How to use congius in a sentence

  • One metreta, a Greek measure, equalled about nine English gallons, and a congius contained about six pints.

    De Re Metallica|Georgius Agricola
  • Congius Ripensis tells us, that the same restriction was imposed by the Lacedæmonians on their Helots and all domestic animals.

    Curiosities of Medical Experience|J. G. (John Gideon) Millingen
  • This is furnished with brazen buckets, each holding about a congius.

    De Re Metallica|Georgius Agricola
  • Perhaps "metreta" and "congius" should be swapped in this sentence, but it was left as is.

    De Re Metallica|Georgius Agricola

British Dictionary definitions for congius

congius
/ (ˈkɒndʒɪəs) /

noun plural -gii (-dʒɪˌaɪ)
pharmacol a unit of liquid measure equal to 1 Imperial gallon
an ancient Roman unit of liquid measure equal to about 0.7 Imperial gallon or 0.84 US gallon

Word Origin for congius

C14: from Latin, probably from Greek konkhos liquid measure, conch
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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