context

[ kon-tekst ]
/ ˈkɒn tɛkst /

noun

the parts of a written or spoken statement that precede or follow a specific word or passage, usually influencing its meaning or effect: You have misinterpreted my remark because you took it out of context.
the set of circumstances or facts that surround a particular event, situation, etc.
Mycology. the fleshy fibrous body of the pileus in mushrooms.

QUIZZES

CAN YOU FEEL THE WEAL WITH THIS WORD OF THE DAY QUIZ?

Did you collect all of last week’s words, but eftsoons forget what they mean? Don’t worry, we’re here to jog your memory. See how many words from the week of May 18 to 24 you can get right!
Question 1 of 7
weal

Origin of context

1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin contextus a joining together, scheme, structure, equivalent to contex(ere) to join by weaving (con- con- + texere to plait, weave) + -tus suffix of v. action; cf. text

OTHER WORDS FROM context

con·text·less, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for context

British Dictionary definitions for context

context
/ (ˈkɒntɛkst) /

noun

the parts of a piece of writing, speech, etc, that precede and follow a word or passage and contribute to its full meaningit is unfair to quote out of context
the conditions and circumstances that are relevant to an event, fact, etc

Word Origin for context

C15: from Latin contextus a putting together, from contexere to interweave, from com- together + texere to weave, braid
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012