con

1
[kon]
See more synonyms for con on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. the argument, position, arguer, or voter against something.
Compare pro1.

Origin of con

1
1575–85; short for Latin contrā in opposition, against

con

2
[kon]
verb (used with object), conned, con·ning.
  1. to learn; study; peruse or examine carefully.
  2. to commit to memory.

Origin of con

2
before 1000; Middle English cunnen, Old English cunnan variant of can1 in sense “become acquainted with, learn to know”

con

3

or conn

[kon]Nautical
verb (used with object), conned, con·ning.
  1. to direct the steering of (a ship).
noun
  1. the station of the person who cons.
  2. the act of conning.

Origin of con

3
1350–1400; earlier cond, apocopated variant of Middle English condie, condue < Middle French cond(u)ire < Latin condūcere to conduct

con

4
[kon]Informal.
adjective
  1. involving abuse of confidence: a con trick.
verb (used with object), conned, con·ning.
  1. to swindle; trick: That crook conned me out of all my savings.
  2. to persuade by deception, cajolery, etc.
noun
  1. a confidence game or swindle.
  2. a lie, exaggeration, or glib self-serving talk: He had a dozen different cons for getting out of paying traffic tickets.

Origin of con

4
1895–1900, Americanism; by shortening of confidence

con

5
[kon]
noun Informal.
  1. a convention, especially one for fans of a particular type of popular culture: sci-fi, gaming, and anime cons.

Origin of con

5
First recorded in 1940–45; by shortening

con

6
[kon]
noun Slang.
  1. a convict.

Origin of con

6
First recorded in 1715–25; by shortening

con

7
[kon]
verb (used with object), conned, con·ning. British Dialect.
  1. to strike, hit, or rap (something or someone).
  2. to hammer (a nail or peg).
  3. to beat or thrash a person with the hands or a weapon.

Origin of con

7
1890–95; perhaps akin to French cognée hatchet, cogner to knock in, drive (a nail) home

con-

  1. variant of com- before a consonant (except b, h, l, p, r) and, by assimilation, before n: convene; condone; connection.

Origin of con-

From Latin

con.

Origin of con.

From the Latin word contrā

Con.

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for con

Contemporary Examples of con

Historical Examples of con

  • It is not the purpose of the authors to discuss the subject pro or con.

    Flying Machines

    W.J. Jackman and Thos. H. Russell

  • And reflexive: con him land geare, knows the land well, 2063; pl.

    Beowulf

    Unknown

  • You fetch that cat here or I'll have Con take him away from you.

    Mary-'Gusta

    Joseph C. Lincoln

  • Con took one or two steps after the flying cat and gave up the chase.

    Mary-'Gusta

    Joseph C. Lincoln

  • Mary-'Gusta was near the edge of the pine grove and Con was close at her heels.

    Mary-'Gusta

    Joseph C. Lincoln


British Dictionary definitions for con

con

1
noun
    1. short for confidence trick
    2. (as modifier)con man
verb cons, conning or conned
  1. (tr) to swindle or defraud

Word Origin for con

C19: from confidence

con

2
noun (usually plural)
  1. an argument or vote against a proposal, motion, etc
  2. a person who argues or votes against a proposal, motion, etc
Compare pro 1See also pros and cons

Word Origin for con

from Latin contrā against, opposed to

con

3
noun
  1. slang short for convict

con

4

esp US conn

nautical
verb cons, conns, conning or conned
  1. (tr) to direct the steering of (a vessel)
noun
  1. the place where a person who cons a vessel is stationed

Word Origin for con

C17 cun, from earlier condien to guide, from Old French conduire, from Latin condūcere; see conduct

con

5
verb cons, conning or conned
  1. (tr) archaic to study attentively or learn (esp in the phrase con by rote)

Word Origin for con

C15: variant of can 1 in the sense: to come to know

con

6
preposition
  1. music with

Word Origin for con

Italian

con-

prefix
  1. a variant of com-

Con.

abbreviation for
  1. Conservative
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for con
n.1

"negation" (mainly in pro and con), 1570s, short for Latin contra "against" (see contra).

n.2

"study," early 15c., from Old English cunnan "to know, know how" (see can (v.1)).

adj.

"swindling," 1889, American English, from confidence man (1849), from the many scams in which the victim is induced to hand over money as a token of confidence. Confidence with a sense of "assurance based on insufficient grounds" dates from 1590s.

v.1

"to guide ships," 1620s, from French conduire "to conduct, lead, guide" (10c.), from Latin conducere (see conduce). Related: Conned; conning.

v.2

"to swindle," 1896, from con (adj.). Related: Conned; conning.

n.3

a slang or colloquial shortening of various nouns beginning in con-, e.g., from the 19th century, confidant, conundrum, conformist, convict, contract, and from the 20th century, conductor, conservative.

con-

word-forming element meaning "together, with," sometimes merely intensive; the form of com- used in Latin before consonants except -b-, -p-, -l-, -m-, or -r-. In native English formations, co- tends to be used where Latin would use con- (e.g. costar).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

con in Medicine

con-

pref.
  1. Variant ofcom-
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.