conversate

[ kon-ver-seyt ]
/ ˈkɒn vərˌseɪt /

verb (used without object), con·ver·sat·ed, con·ver·sat·ing.Nonstandard except in some dialects.

to have a conversation; converse; talk.

VIDEO FOR CONVERSATE

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Listen up, word nerds, this video is for you. Firstly, don't hate ... watch with an open mind. Because words like firstly may be nonstandard, sure, but that doesn't mean they're wrong.

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“I do believe that the buck stops here, that I cannot rely upon public opinion polls to tell me what is right. I do believe that right makes might and that if I am wrong, 10 angels swearing I was right would make no difference.”

Origin of conversate

First recorded in 1970-75; back formation from conversation

historical usage of conversate

The use of conversate has soared since 2000, mostly in speech and in written records of speech. The term is a back formation from conversation, created by dropping the suffix -ion, and adding -e, to produce a verb form.
Since it has essentially the same meaning as the more common and frequently used verb converse, the term conversate has been condemned in some circles as an unnecessary nonword. And, because the term occurs mostly among Blacks and Latinos, some discussions have become heated and impassioned, turning the word into a badge (both positive and negative) of a person’s class and education.
Conversate reminds us that discussions about modern English must take into account the different types of English spoken in our diverse culture, rather than fixating on “correct” formal usage. When all is said and done, however, the term broadly remains nonstandard English.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020