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View synonyms for cordon

cordon

[ kawr-dn ]

noun

  1. a line of police, sentinels, military posts, warships, etc., enclosing or guarding an area.
  2. a cord or braid worn for ornament or as a fastening.
  3. a ribbon worn usually diagonally across the breast as a badge of a knightly or honorary order.
  4. Fortification.
    1. a projecting course of stones at the base of a parapet.
    2. the coping of a scarp.
  5. Architecture.
    1. a stringcourse, especially one having little or no projection.
    2. a cut-stone riser on a stepped ramp or the like.
  6. a fruit tree or shrub trained to grow along a support or a series of such supports.


verb (used with object)

  1. to surround or blockade with or as with a cordon (usually followed by off ):

    The police cordoned off the street.

cordon

/ ˈkɔːdən /

noun

  1. a chain of police, soldiers, ships, etc, stationed around an area
  2. a ribbon worn as insignia of honour or rank
  3. a cord or ribbon worn as an ornament or fastening
  4. Also calledstring coursebelt coursetable architect an ornamental projecting band or continuous moulding along a wall
  5. horticulture a form of fruit tree consisting of a single stem bearing fruiting spurs, produced by cutting back all lateral branches


verb

  1. troften foll byoff to put or form a cordon (around); close (off)

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Word History and Origins

Origin of cordon1

1400–50; Middle English < Middle French, diminutive of corde

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Word History and Origins

Origin of cordon1

C16: from Old French, literally: a little cord, from corde string, cord

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Example Sentences

The large group of protesters wanted to get past the cordon and head towards the parade gathering.

She drove toward the house but could not get past the police cordon.

From Time

You are in the jurisdiction of the starostie, and I am grand officer of the crown, and grand cordon of the White Eagle.

I threaded my way through the silent throng of spectators, but was stopped at Fourth Street by a cordon of police.

Turkish authorities poured into the small town to cordon off the sites, with riot police keeping the crowds away.

Cordon off a few key machines and the assembly line cannot function.

A group of people can cordon off your dies and force management to use nightsticks if they want to get at them.

Finally the rioters were driven back, and a cordon of troops assured the safety of the capital.

A double cordon of soldiers were stationed around the walls, to arrest all who should attempt to escape.

Afterward, outside the police cordon thrown around the building, somebody jostled against him, peered under his hat brim.

The men who were not on guard lay under the vehicles so as to form a cordon around the mules.

A cordon of soldiers, placed at a distance from the pyre, kept the inquisitive from drawing too near.

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