cornet

[kawr-net for 1; kawr-nit, kawr-net for 2–8]

noun


RELATED WORDS


Nearby words

  1. cornerback,
  2. cornered,
  3. cornerman,
  4. cornerstone,
  5. cornerwise,
  6. cornet-à-pistons,
  7. cornetcy,
  8. cornetfish,
  9. cornetist,
  10. cornett

Origin of cornet

1325–75; Middle English < Middle French, Old French, equivalent to corn horn (< Latin cornū; see cornu) + -et -et

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for cornet


British Dictionary definitions for cornet

cornet

noun

Also called: cornet à pistons (ˈkɔːnɪt ə ˈpɪstənz, French kɔrnɛ a pistɔ̃) a three-valved brass instrument of the trumpet family. Written range: about two and a half octaves upwards from E below middle C. It is a transposing instrument in B flat or A
a person who plays the cornet
a variant spelling of cornett
a cone-shaped paper container for sweets, etc
British a cone-shaped wafer container for ice cream
(formerly) the lowest rank of commissioned cavalry officer in the British army
Southern African short for field cornet
a starched and wired muslin or lace cap worn by women from the 12th to the 15th centuries
the large white headdress of some nuns

Word Origin for cornet

C14: from Old French, from corn, from Latin cornū horn

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for cornet

cornet

n.

c.1400, "A wind instrument made of wood and provided with six finger holes" [Middle English Dictionary], from Old French cornet (14c.) "a small horn," diminutive of corn "a horn," from Latin cornu "horn" (see horn (n.)). Modern use is short for cornet-à-pistons "cornet with pistons."

The quality of the tone is penetrating and unsympathetic, by no means equal to that of the trumpet, for which it is commonly substituted. ["cornet" entry in "Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia," 1902]
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper