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Cornish

[ kawr-nish ]

adjective

  1. of, relating to, or characteristic of Cornwall, England, its inhabitants, or the Cornish language.


noun

  1. the Celtic language of Cornwall, extinct since c1800.
  2. one of an English breed of chickens raised chiefly for crossing with other breeds to produce roasters.

Cornish

/ ˈkɔːnɪʃ /

adjective

  1. of, relating to, or characteristic of Cornwall, its inhabitants, their former language, or their present-day dialect of English


noun

  1. a former language of Cornwall, belonging to the S Celtic branch of the Indo-European family and closely related to Breton: extinct by 1800
  2. the Cornish
    functioning as plural the natives or inhabitants of Cornwall
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Word History and Origins

Origin of Cornish1

1350–1400; late Middle English, apparently syncopated variant of Middle English Cornwelisse. See Cornwall, -ish 1
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Example Sentences

Cornish game hensNothing says personal like an individual Cornish game hen.

When Cornish told his mom earlier than expected that he had made a decision, she was shocked.

With Cornish’s commitment, the Terrapins added to their recent success in pulling standout players from Baltimore.

Cornish’s older brother played with both Morsell and Smith at times during their youth careers.

Once Cornish announced his decision, Smith’s dad sent him a long message with advice.

Two years later, in 1953, he evacuated to Cornish and became a celebrity recluse.

Even after Salinger had decamped to Cornish, he loved to lunch with William Shawn and Lillian Ross at the Algonquin in New York.

In fact, Salinger spent his last, reclusive decades in his Cornish, N.H. living room, screening Lost Horizon and other classics.

CORNISH: Now, what about some of the other business people Romney is spotlighting?

[HOST AUDIE] CORNISH: But I understand there's more to Gilchrist's story.

This company has been anxious to get me to Holland, having heard of the duty performed by the Cornish engines.

The Cornish tin, according to present evidence, was worked comparatively little, and perhaps most in the later Empire.

After daring and trying and tiring, these dour men eventually turned adre, which is Cornish for homeward.

My father was a Cornish man, the youngest, as I have heard him say, of seven brothers.

But the happy home life in the Cornish rectory was to end all too quickly.

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CorningCornishman