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Cotswold

[ kots-wohld, -wuhld ]

noun

  1. one of an English breed of large sheep having coarse, long wool.


Cotswold

/ ˈkɒtsˌwəʊld; -wəld /

noun

  1. a breed of sheep with long wool that originated in the Cotswolds. It is believed to be one of the oldest breeds in the world


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Word History and Origins

Origin of Cotswold1

Named after the Cotswolds, where the breed originated

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Example Sentences

A few weeks after returning from England, I was trolling the dairy section and came across the Cotswold Double Gloucester.

They buried Patrick Leigh Fermor in the soft green turf of a Cotswold graveyard on a cloudy Thursday afternoon.

The Cotswold Hills are, in any case, above dispute as the cradle-ground of the river, and may be happy with either claimant.

Cotswold wool, and some other inferior wools, do not measure more than nine spirals to the inch.

The Cotswold mature young, and the flesh will vary in weight from fifteen to thirty pounds per quarter.

The New Leicester is less hardy than the Cotswold, but heavier, weighing from twenty-four to thirty-six pounds per quarter.

We were in a bleak stone country, where stone walls take the place of hedges, and where the landscape bears a Cotswold look.

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