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covet

[ kuhv-it ]
/ ˈkʌv ɪt /
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See synonyms for: covet / coveted / coveting / covetable on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object)
to desire wrongfully, inordinately, or without due regard for the rights of others: to covet another's property.
to wish for, especially eagerly: He won the prize they all coveted.
verb (used without object)
to have an inordinate or wrongful desire.
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Origin of covet

First recorded in 1325–1350; Middle English coveiten, from Anglo-French coveiter, Old French coveit(i)er, from unattested Vulgar Latin cupiditāre, verbal derivative of Latin cupiditās cupidity

synonym study for covet

1. See envy.

OTHER WORDS FROM covet

cov·et·a·ble, adjectivecov·et·er, nouncov·et·ing·ly, adverbun·cov·et·ing, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use covet in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for covet

covet
/ (ˈkʌvɪt) /

verb -vets, -veting or -veted (tr)
to wish, long, or crave for (something, esp the property of another person)

Derived forms of covet

covetable, adjectivecoveter, noun

Word Origin for covet

C13: from Old French coveitier, from coveitié eager desire, ultimately from Latin cupiditā cupidity
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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