coy

[ koi ]
/ kɔɪ /
||

adjective, coy·er, coy·est.

verb (used without object)

Archaic. to act in a coy manner.

verb (used with object) Obsolete.

to quiet; soothe.
to pat; caress.

Origin of coy

1300–50; Middle English < Anglo-French coi, quoy calm, Old French quei < Vulgar Latin *quētus, for Latin quiētus quiet1
SYNONYMS FOR coy
Related forms
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for coying

  • She threw from her, at once, as vain and wicked and false, all idea of coying her love.

    The Eustace Diamonds|Anthony Trollope

British Dictionary definitions for coying

coy

/ (kɔɪ) /

adjective

(usually of a woman) affectedly demure, esp in a playful or provocative manner
shy; modest
evasive, esp in an annoying way
Derived Formscoyish, adjectivecoyly, adverbcoyness, noun

Word Origin for coy

C14: from Old French coi reserved, from Latin quiētus quiet
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for coying

coy


adj.

early 14c., "quiet, modest, demure," from Old French coi, earlier quei "quiet, still, placid, gentle," ultimately from Latin quietus "resting, at rest" (see quiet (n.)). Meaning "shy" emerged late 14c. Meaning "unwilling to commit" is 1961. Related: Coyly; coyness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper