quiet

1
[ kwahy-it ]
/ ˈkwaɪ ɪt /

adjective, qui·et·er, qui·et·est.

verb (used with object)

verb (used without object)

to become quiet (often followed by down).

Origin of quiet

1
1350–1400; (adj.) Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin quiētus, past participle of quiēscere (see quiescent); (v.) Middle English quieten, partly derivative of the adj., partly < Late Latin quiētāre, derivative of quiētus. Cf. coy

Related forms

Can be confused

quiescent quietquiet quit quitequietness quietude

Synonym study

2. See still1.

Definition for quiet (2 of 2)

quiet

2
[ kwahy-it ]
/ ˈkwaɪ ɪt /

noun

freedom from noise, unwanted sound, etc.: At least there's quiet here.
freedom from disturbance or tumult; tranquillity; rest; repose: to live in quiet.
peace; peaceful condition of affairs.

Origin of quiet

2
1300–50; Middle English quiet(e) (< Middle French quiete) < Latin quiēt- (stem of quiēs) rest, peace; akin to quiēscere (see quiescent)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for quiet

British Dictionary definitions for quiet

quiet

/ (ˈkwaɪət) /

adjective

noun

the state of being silent, peaceful, or untroubled
on the quiet without other people knowing; secretly

verb

a less common word for quieten

Derived Forms

quietness, noun

Word Origin for quiet

C14: from Latin quiētus, past participle of quiēscere to rest, from quiēs repose, rest
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with quiet

quiet


In addition to the idiom beginning with quiet

  • quiet as a mouse

also see:

  • keep quiet
  • peace and quiet
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.