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cram

[ kram ]
/ kræm /
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verb (used with object), crammed, cram·ming.
verb (used without object), crammed, cram·ming.
noun
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Origin of cram

First recorded before 1000; Middle English crammen, Old English crammian “to stuff,” akin to crimman “to put in”

OTHER WORDS FROM cram

cram·ming·ly, adverbwell-crammed, adjective

Other definitions for cram (2 of 2)

Cram
[ kram ]
/ kræm /

noun
Ralph Adams, 1863–1942, U.S. architect and writer.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

How to use cram in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for cram (1 of 2)

cram
/ (kræm) /

verb crams, cramming or crammed
(tr) to force (people, material, etc) into (a room, container, etc) with more than it can hold; stuff
to eat or cause to eat more than necessary
informal to study or cause to study (facts, etc), esp for an examination, by hastily memorizing
noun
the act or condition of cramming
a crush

Word Origin for cram

Old English crammian; related to Old Norse kremja to press

British Dictionary definitions for cram (2 of 2)

Cram
/ (kræm) /

noun
Steve. born 1960, English middle-distance runner: European 1500 m champion (1981, 1986); world 1500 m champion (1983)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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