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Cranborne money

/ (ˈkrænbɔːn) /
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noun

(in Britain) the annual payment made to Opposition parties in the House of Lords to help them pay for certain services necessary to the carrying out of their parliamentary duties; established in 1996Compare Short money

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“Was” is used for the indicative past tense of “to be,” and “were” is only used for the subjunctive past tense.

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Word Origin for Cranborne money

named after Viscount Cranborne, Leader of the House of Lords in 1996
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

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