cranny

[ kran-ee ]
/ ˈkræn i /

noun, plural cran·nies.

a small, narrow opening in a wall, rock, etc.; chink; crevice; fissure: They searched every nook and cranny for the missing ring.
a small out-of-the-way place or obscure corner; nook.

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Origin of cranny

1400–50; late Middle English crany, perhaps < Middle French crené, past participle of crener to notch, groove; see crenel

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH cranny

cranny nook
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for cranny

British Dictionary definitions for cranny

cranny
/ (ˈkrænɪ) /

noun plural -nies

a narrow opening, as in a wall or rock face; chink; crevice (esp in the phrase every nook and cranny)

Derived forms of cranny

crannied, adjective

Word Origin for cranny

C15: from Old French cran notch, fissure; compare crenel
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with cranny

cranny

see nook and cranny.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.