crutch

[kruhch]

noun

verb (used with object)

to support on crutches; prop; sustain.

Nearby words

  1. crusted,
  2. crustedly,
  3. crustose,
  4. crusty,
  5. crut,
  6. crutched friar,
  7. crutchings,
  8. crutzen,
  9. cruveilhier,
  10. cruveilhier's disease

Origin of crutch

before 900; Middle English crucche, Old English cryce (oblique crycce); cognate with Norwegian krykkja, Danish krykke, German Krücke, Dutch kruk. See crook1

Related formscrutch·like, adjective

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for crutch


British Dictionary definitions for crutch

crutch

noun

a long staff of wood or metal having a rest for the armpit, for supporting the weight of the body
something that supports or sustainsa crutch to the economy
British another word for crotch (def. 1)
nautical
  1. a forked support for a boom or oar, etc
  2. a brace for reinforcing the frames at the stern of a wooden vessel

verb

(tr) to support or sustain (a person or thing) as with a crutch
Australian and NZ slang to clip (wool) from the hindquarters of a sheep

Word Origin for crutch

Old English crycc; related to Old High German krucka, Old Norse krykkja; see crosier, crook

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for crutch

crutch

n.

Old English crycce "crutch, staff," from Proto-Germanic *krukjo (cf. Old Saxon krukka, Middle Dutch crucke, Old High German krucka, German Kröcke "crutch," related to Old Norse krokr "hook;" see crook). Figurative sense is first recorded c.1600. As a verb, from 1640s. Italian gruccia "crutch," crocco "hook" are Germanic loan-words.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for crutch

crutch

[krŭch]

n.

A staff or support used by a physically injured or disabled individual as an aid in walking, usually designed to fit under the armpit and often used in pairs.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.