Idioms

Origin of corner

1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French, equivalent to Old French corne corner, horn (< Latin cornū horn; cf. cornu) + -er -er2
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British Dictionary definitions for cut corners (1 of 2)

Corner


noun

the Corner informal an area in central Australia, at the junction of the borders of Queensland and South Australia

British Dictionary definitions for cut corners (2 of 2)

corner

/ (ˈkɔːnə) /

noun

verb

Word Origin for corner

C13: from Old French corniere, from Latin cornū point, extremity, horn
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with cut corners (1 of 2)

cut corners


Do something in the easiest or least expensive way; also, act illegally. For example, Cutting corners in production led to a definite loss in product quality, or If the accountant cuts corners the auditors are sure to find out. This term alludes to rounding a corner as closely as possible in order to shorten the distance traversed and/or save time. [Late 1800s]

Idioms and Phrases with cut corners (2 of 2)

corner


In addition to the idiom beginning with corner

  • corner the market

also see:

  • around the corner
  • cut corners
  • four corners of the earth
  • in a tight corner
  • out of the corner of one's eye
  • paint oneself into a corner
  • turn the corner
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.