damnify

[ dam-nuh-fahy ]
/ ˈdæm nəˌfaɪ /

verb (used with object), dam·ni·fied, dam·ni·fy·ing.Law.

to cause loss or damage to.

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Origin of damnify

1505–15; <Middle French damnifier,Old French <Late Latin damnificāre, derivative of Latin damnific(us) harmful, equivalent to damn(um) damage + -ificus (see -i-, -fic); see -ify

OTHER WORDS FROM damnify

un·dam·ni·fied, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for damnify

  • We should damnify religion if we separated it from philosophy: we should ruin philosophy if we divorced it from religion.

    Thoughts on Life and Religion|Friedrich Max Mller
  • Alexander commanded his soldiers neither to damnify Pindarus, the poet, nor any of his family.

    Microcosmography|John Earle
  • In Haverhill, in 1708, young women were permitted to build pews, provided they did not "damnify the Stairway."

British Dictionary definitions for damnify

damnify
/ (ˈdæmnɪˌfaɪ) /

verb -fies, -fying or -fied (tr)

law to cause loss or damage to (a person); injure

Derived forms of damnify

damnification, noun

Word Origin for damnify

C16: from Old French damnifier, ultimately from Latin damnum harm, + facere to make
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012