dated

[dey-tid]

adjective

having or showing a date: a dated record of all meetings.
out-of-date; old-fashioned: a nostalgic program of dated songs.

Nearby words

  1. date rape,
  2. date squares,
  3. date stamp,
  4. date-stamp,
  5. datebook,
  6. datedly,
  7. datel,
  8. dateless,
  9. dateline,
  10. dating

Origin of dated

First recorded in 1580–90; date1 + -ed3

Related formsdat·ed·ly, adverbdat·ed·ness, nounun·dat·ed, adjective

date

1
[deyt]

noun

a particular month, day, and year at which some event happened or will happen: July 4, 1776 was the date of the signing of the Declaration of Independence.
the day of the month: Is today's date the 7th or the 8th?
an inscription on a writing, coin, etc., that shows the time, or time and place, of writing, casting, delivery, etc.: a letter bearing the date January 16.
the time or period to which any event or thing belongs; period in general: at a late date.
the time during which anything lasts; duration: The pity is that childhood has so short a date.
an appointment for a particular time: They have a date with their accountant at ten o'clock.
a social appointment or engagement arranged beforehand with another person, especially when a romantic relationship exists or may develop: to go out on a Saturday night date.
a person with whom one has such a social appointment or engagement: Can I bring a date to the party?
an engagement for an entertainer to perform.
dates, the birth and death dates, usually in years, of a person: Dante's dates are 1265 to 1321.

verb (used without object), dat·ed, dat·ing.

to have or bear a date: The letter dates from 1873.
to belong to a particular period; have its origin: That dress dates from the 19th century. The architecture dates as far back as 1830.
to reckon from some point in time: The custom dates from the days when women wore longer skirts.
to go out socially on dates: She dated a lot during high school.

verb (used with object), dat·ed, dat·ing.

to mark or furnish with a date: Please date the check as of today.
to ascertain or fix the period or point in time of; assign a period or point in time to: The archaeologist dated the ruins as belonging to the early Minoan period.
to show the age of; show to be old-fashioned.
to make a date with; go out on dates with: He's been dating his best friend's sister.

Origin of date

1
1275–1325; (noun) Middle English < Middle French < Late Latin data, noun use of data (feminine of datus, past participle of dare to give), from the phrase data (Romae) written, given (at Rome); (v.) Middle English daten to sign or date a document, derivative of the noun

Related forms
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for dated


British Dictionary definitions for dated

dated

adjective

unfashionable; outmodeddated clothes
(of a security) having a fixed date for redemption

date

1

noun

a specified day of the monthtoday's date is October 27
the particular day or year of an eventthe date of the Norman Conquest was 1066
(plural) the years of a person's birth and death or of the beginning and end of an event or period
an inscription on a coin, letter, etc, stating when it was made or written
  1. an appointment for a particular time, esp with a person to whom one is sexually or romantically attachedshe has a dinner date
  2. the person with whom the appointment is made
the present moment; now (esp in the phrases to date, up to date)

verb

(tr) to mark (a letter, coin, etc) with the day, month, or year
(tr) to assign a date of occurrence or creation to
(intr; foll by from or back to) to have originated (at a specified time)his decline dates from last summer
(tr) to reveal the age ofthat dress dates her
to make or become old-fashionedsome good films hardly date at all
informal, mainly US and Canadian
  1. to be a boyfriend or girlfriend of (someone of the opposite sex)
  2. to accompany (a member of the opposite sex) on a date
Derived Formsdatable or dateable, adjectivedateless, adjective

Word Origin for date

C14: from Old French, from Latin dare to give, as in the phrase epistula data Romae letter handed over at Rome

xref

See year

date

2

noun

the fruit of the date palm, having sweet edible flesh and a single large woody seed
short for date palm

Word Origin for date

C13: from Old French, from Latin, from Greek daktulos finger

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for dated
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with dated

date

In addition to the idiom beginning with date

  • date rape

also see

  • bring up to date
  • double date
  • make a date
  • out of date
  • to date
  • up to date
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.