decussate

[verb dih-kuhs-eyt, dek-uh-seyt; adjective dih-kuhs-eyt, -it]
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adjective
  1. in the form of an X; crossed; intersected.
  2. Botany. arranged along the stem in pairs, each pair at right angles to the pair next above or below, as leaves.

Origin of decussate

1650–60; < Medieval Latin decussātus divided in the form of an X (past participle of decussāre), equivalent to Latin decuss(is) the numeral ten, orig., a ten-as weight (dec(em) ten + -ussis, combining form of as as2) + -ātus -ate1
Related formsde·cus·sate·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for decussate

crisscross, bisect, crosscut, intersect

Examples from the Web for decussate

Historical Examples of decussate


British Dictionary definitions for decussate

decussate

verb (dɪˈkʌseɪt)
  1. to cross or cause to cross in the form of the letter X; intersect
adjective (dɪˈkʌseɪt, dɪˈkʌsɪt)
  1. in the form of the letter X; crossed; intersected
  2. botany (esp of leaves) arranged in opposite pairs, with each pair at right angles to the one above and below it
Derived Formsdecussately, adverbdecussation, noun

Word Origin for decussate

C17: from Latin decussāre, from decussis the number ten, from decem ten
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for decussate
v.

1650s, from Latin decussatus, past participle of decussare "to divide crosswise, to cross in the form of an 'X,'" from decussis "the figure 'ten'" (in Roman numerals, represented by X) from decem "ten" (see ten). As an adjective, from 1825.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

decussate in Medicine

decussate

[dĭ-kŭsāt′, dĕkə-sāt′]
v.
  1. To cross or become crossed so as to form an X; intersect.
adj.
  1. Intersected or crossed in the form of an X.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.