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deep field

[ deep feeld ]

noun

, Astronomy.
  1. a composite image of far distant objects in space, compiled from multiple exposures capturing blue, red, and infrared light, with the wavelength of each contributing data points by which the distance and age of a cosmic object can be calculated (often used attributively): The most recent deep field images could help astronomers understand the chemistry of the early universe.

    The James Webb Space Telescope can capture deep fields far more distant than Hubble ever could.

    The most recent deep field images could help astronomers understand the chemistry of the early universe.



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Word History and Origins

Origin of deep field1

First recorded in 1870–75 as a term in cricket; as an astronomical term in 1995–2000

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Example Sentences

Watching the minnies in the air rather resembled waiting for a high catch in the deep field at cricket.

Mr. Stanley Dromard, who had been scoring heavily all the week, happened to be in the deep field close to the tent.

A laugh trembles its way round the spectators, as Lancaster places his men in the deep field.

"He was a good forward and a good deep field," Alan granted.

In the deep field Desmond was standing, miserable because he had nothing to do.

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