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defy

[ verb dih-fahy; noun dih-fahy, dee-fahy ]
/ verb dɪˈfaɪ; noun dɪˈfaɪ, ˈdi faɪ /
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See synonyms for: defy / defied / defies on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object), de·fied, de·fy·ing.
to challenge the power of; resist boldly or openly: to defy parental authority.
to offer effective resistance to: a fort that defies attack.
to challenge (a person) to do something deemed impossible: They defied him to dive off the bridge.
Archaic. to challenge to a combat or contest.
noun, plural de·fies.
a challenge; a defiance.
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Origin of defy

1250–1300; Middle English defien<Old French desfier, equivalent to des-dis-1 + fier to trust <Vulgar Latin *fīdāre, variant of Latin fīdere

OTHER WORDS FROM defy

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use defy in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for defy

defy
/ (dɪˈfaɪ) /

verb -fies, -fying or -fied (tr)
to resist (a powerful person, authority, etc) openly and boldly
to elude, esp in a baffling wayhis actions defy explanation
formal to challenge or provoke (someone to do something judged to be impossible); dareI defy you to climb that cliff
archaic to invite to do battle or combat

Derived forms of defy

defier, noun

Word Origin for defy

C14: from Old French desfier, from des- de- + fier to trust, from Latin fīdere
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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