deflower

[ dih-flou-er ]
/ dɪˈflaʊ ər /

verb (used with object)

to deprive (a woman) of virginity.
to despoil of beauty, freshness, sanctity, etc.
to deprive or strip of flowers: The deer had deflowered an entire section of the garden.

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Origin of deflower

1350–1400; Middle English deflouren<Old French desflorer<Latin dēflōrāre, equivalent to dē-de- + flōr-, stem of flōsflower + -āre infinitive suffix

OTHER WORDS FROM deflower

de·flow·er·er, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for deflower

  • Individual inspiration was a sacred thing, which reality with its rules and prejudices could only spoil and deflower.

  • In Poland, the noblemen arrogated the right to deflower any maid they pleased, and a hundred lashes were given him who complained.

  • For she deliberately sent down to the beach her daughter, who was of marriageable age, and prompted her father to deflower her.

    The Danish History, Books I-IX|Saxo Grammaticus ("Saxo the Learned")

British Dictionary definitions for deflower

deflower
/ (diːˈflaʊə) /

verb (tr)

to deprive of virginity, esp by rupturing the hymen through sexual intercourse
to despoil of beauty, innocence, etc; mar; violate
to rob or despoil of flowers

Derived forms of deflower

deflowerer, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012