demeanor

[dih-mee-ner]
Also especially British, de·mean·our.

Origin of demeanor

First recorded in 1425–75, demeanor is from the late Middle English word demenure. See demean2, -or1

Synonyms for demeanor

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for demeanour

Historical Examples of demeanour


British Dictionary definitions for demeanour

demeanour

US demeanor

noun
  1. the way a person behaves towards others; conduct
  2. bearing, appearance, or mien

Word Origin for demeanour

C15: see demean ²
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for demeanour

chiefly British English spelling of demeanor; for suffix, see -or.

demeanor

n.

late 15c., from obsolete Middle English demean "handle, manage, conduct," later "behave in a certain way" (early 14c.), from Old French demener (11c.) "to guide, conduct; to live, dwell," from de- "completely" (see de-) + mener "to lead, direct," from Latin minare "to threaten," in Late Latin "to drive (a herd of animals);" see menace. Sense in English evolved from notion of "conduct, manage" (oneself). Spelling changed by influence of nouns in -or, -our.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper